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FBISE 11th & 12th Reduced Syllabus

FBISE 11th & 12th Reduced Syllabus

Federal Board of intermediate and Secondary Education upload FBISE 11th & 12th Reduced Syllabus on official Website www.fbise.edu.pk. There will be no change in the format and style of question papers.

REDUCED SYLLABUS ENGLISH ELECTIVE-XI
NOTE: There will be no change in the following fields:
1. Any essay of a relatively advanced nature.
2. A passage of fairly advanced prose for comprehension and precis writing.
3. Grammar – Synthesis Idioms.
Section “A” Functional English
1. Any essay of relatively advanced nature
2. A passage of fairly advanced prose followed by:
a. A series of comprehension questions.
b. A precis of all parts of the passage.
Section “B” Text
3. Poetry: The Magic Casement: Book-II (Poem No.5, 7, 11, 12, 16. 19 and 20 are excluded.
4. Prose: A new Anthology of Essays (Essay No.3. 5. 8. 11. 12, 13, 19, and 22 are excluded.
5. Grammar: Synthesis’Idioms.

FBISE 11th & 12th Reduced Syllabus

REDUC ED SYLLABUS ISLAMIC HISTORY-XI
Pre-Islamic Arabia
Religious. Social Economic and Political conditions of Pre-Islamic Arabia
Early Life of Rasullah (S.A.W.)
1. Birth and family background of Rasullah (S.A.W)
2. Life before NUBUWAiIT
3. Life after the declaration of NUBUWAI IT
Spread of Islam at Makkah
1. Migration to Iiabshah
2. Journey to Tail* and Miraj
3. The pledges of Aqaba
Spread of Islam at Madina
1. I lijrat and its significance
2. Islamic brotherhood
3. Misaq-e-Madina
4. Battle of Badr. Uhad. Ahzab. Khyber, Hunain and Tabuk
5. Baite-Rizwan
6. Conquest of Makkah
7. HajjatulWidda and the Last Sermon features
Scerat-un-Nabi (S.A.W)
Muhammad Rasullah (S.A.W)
1. Asa Prophet
2. As a Statesman
Khalafat-e-Rashdah
1.Hazrat Abu Bakar Siddique: Introduction, initial difficulties, its remedies and contribution towards Islam
2. HazratUmer Farooq: Introduction. Conquest (Qadsia and Yermook). administrative
the system, contribution towards Islam, and achievements
3. Hazrat Usman Ghani: Introduction, contribution towards Islam, martyrdom its causes, events, and results.
4. Hazrat Ali Murtaza: Introduction, difficulties, and events.
5. Achievements of Khalafat-e-Rashdah.

REDUCED SYLLABUS HISTORY OF PAKISTAN-XI
I. Difficulties Faced by Pakistan after Independence
1. Red Cliff s Award and its injustice.
2. Accession of Princely States Kashmir.
3. Refugee’s problem.
4. Administrative issues.
5. Water dispute
II. Constitutional Developments in Pakistan up to 1962
1. Objective Resolution.
2. Salient features of:
a. 1956 Constitution.
b. 1962 Constitution Salient features.
III. Socio-Political Developments in Historical Perspective During 1962 – 1969.
1. Formation of one Unit.
2. Imposition of Martial Law.
3. Industrial and agriculture reforms.
4. 1965 War in relation to:
i. The aggressive and inflexible attitude of Indian governments towards Pakistan.
IV. Anatomy of the Happenings from 1969 to 1971.
1. Fall of Ayub’s regime and Yahyah’s Marshal Law.
2. Elections 1970.
3. Impact of 1970’s elections.
4. Sheikh Mujeb’s six points.
5. Army action and role of political parties.
6. Causes and lessons learnt from the debacle of Pakistan 1971.
V. Pakistan Foreign Policy.
1. Main features of foreign policy.
2. Relations bonds with neighbouring countries.
3. Relations with Saudi Arabia.

REDUCED SYLLABUS PHYSICS-XI
01. MEASUREMENTS
1.2 Supplementary units (Radian. Steradian)
1.8 Precision and accuracy
1.9 Dimensions of physical quantities.
02. VECTORS AND EQUILIBRIUM
2.6 Addition of vectors by rectangular components.
2.7 Product of vectors.
2.9 Torque
2.10 Equilibrium.
2.11 Conditions of equilibrium.
03. FORCES AND MOTION
3.8 Linear momentum.
3.9 Collisions
3.11 Projectile Motion.
04. WORK AND ENERGY.
4.1 Work done by a constant force, work is done by a variable force.
4.2 Work done in a gravitational field.
4.6 Absolute Potential energy.
4.7 Escape velocity.
05. ROTATIONAL AND CIRCULAR MOTION.
5.1 Angular Motion.
5.2 Relation between angular and linear quantities.
5.3 Centripetal Force and Centripetal Acceleration.
5.4 Torque and moment of inertia.
5.5 Angular momentum and torque.
5.6 Conversation of Angular Momentum
5.7 K.E of rotation.
5.8 Rolling of a Disc and hoop down the inclined plane.
06. FLUID DYNAMICS.
6.1 Viscous Fluids.
6.2 Fluid Friction and Stoke’s Law.
6.3 Terminal Velocity.
6.4 Equation of continuity.
07. OSCILLATIONS.
7.4 Circular motion and S.H.M.
7.5 Simple Pendulum.
7.7 Resonance.
7.9 Phase.
7.10 Damped Oscillations.

08.WAVES
8.4 Speed of sound.
8.8 Beats
8.9 Reflection of Waves and Phase Change
8.10 Stationary Waves.
8.11 Transverse Stationary waves in a stretched string.
8.13 Resonance of air column and organ pipes.
8.14 Doppler effect.
09. PHYSICAL OPTICS
9.3 Huygen’s Principle.
9.4 Coherent Sources.
9.5 Interference of Light.
9.8 Michelson’s interferometer.
9.9 Diffraction of Light
9.10 Diffraction at a Single Slit
9.11 Diffraction grating.
9.12 Diffraction of x-rays by crystals.
9.13 Polarization of light. Applications of polarized light.
10. THERMODYNAMICS
10.5 Thermodynamic System.
10.6 Reversible and Irreversible Processes
10.7 First law of thermodynamics.
10.8 Molar specific heat of a gas.
10.9 Heat engine.
10.10 Second law of thermodynamics.
10.11 Carnot heat engine.
10.13 Entropy.
NOTE: All MCQ’s. short questions and problems relevant to the abovementioned topics are included.

REDUCED SYLLABUS BIOLOGY HSSC-I
NOTE:
1. Only topic-based relevant MCQs. Short and Long Questions are included.
2. All information inside boxes is excluded.
CELL STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION
12 Cell Wall and Plasma Membrane – The Boundary Wall
1.3 Cytoplasm and Organelles
1.4 Prokaryotic and Eukaryotic Cells
BIOLOGICAL MOLECULES
2.3 Carbohydrates (Examples of Polysaccharides arc excluded)
2.4 Proteins
2.5
2.6
2.4.1 Structure of Proteins (Amino Acids and Peptide Linkages)
2.4.2 Classification of Proteins (Globular and Fibrous Proteins)
2.4.3 Role of Proteins
Lipids
2.5.1 Classification (Acylglyccrols)
2.5.2 Properties of Fatty acids
(Waxes. Tcrpcncs. Steroids. Prostaglandins arc excluded)
Nucleic Acids
2.6.1 Chemical Structure of Nucleic Acids
2.6.3 Watson & Crick Model of DNA
2.6.4 Concept of Gene
2.6.5 RNA
ENZYMES
3.1 Structure of Enzymes
32 Mechanism of Enzyme Action
3.4 Enzyme Inhibition (Competitive and Noncompetitive Inhibitors)
BIOENERGETICS
4.1 Photosynthesis
4.1.1 Role of Light
4.1.2 Role of Photosynthetic Pigments
4.1.3 Absorption Spectrum and Action Spectrum
4.1.4 Arrangements of Pigments
4.1.5 Role of Carbon dioxide
4.1.6 Role of water
4.1.7 Mechanism of Photosynthesis
4.1.8 Light Dependent Phase
4.1.9 Light Independent Phase
4.2 Cellular Respiration
4.2.3 Mechanism of AcrobicRcspiration
4.2.4 Oxidation of Pynivatcs
4.2.5 Kreb’s Cycle
4.2.6 Electron Transport Chain
4.2.7 Chcmiosmosis & Oxidative Phosphorylation
ACELLULAR LIFE
5.3 Bacteriophage
5.3.1 Structure of Bacteriophage
5.3.2 Life Cycle of Bacteriophage
5.3.3 Infection Process
5.3.4 Replication of Bacteriophage
5.3.5 Replication of Bacteriophage in Lysogenic cycle

(Uses of Bacteriophages tn Genetic Engineering is excluded !
5.4 Human Immuno Deficiency Virus
5.4.1 Structure of HIV
5.4.2 Life Cycle of HIV
6. PROKARYOTES
6.2 Archaea
6.3 Bacteria: Ecology and Diversity
6.4 Structure: Shape and Size of Bacteria
6.5 Modes of Nutrition in Bacteria
6.6 Growth and Reproduction in Bactcna
7. PRO USTS AND FUNGI
7.2 Major groups of Protists (protozoa, algae, myxomycota. oomycota)
7.3 General characteristics of Fungi
7.4 Diversity among Fungi (Zygomycota. Ascomycota. Basidiomycota)
8. DIVERSITY AMONG PLANTS
8.2 Nonvaseular Plants (General characteristics)
8.3 Seedless Vascular Plants (General characteristics)
8.3.1 Evolution of Leaf
8.4 Seed Plants
8.4.2 Gymnosperms (General characteristics)
8.4.3 Angiosperms (General characteristics and Life cycle)
8.4.6 Inflorescence excluded
9. DIVERSITY AMONG ANIMALS
9.1 Characteristics of animals
9.2 Criteria for animal classification
9.3 Diversity in Animals
9.3.1 Invertebrates
9.3.2 Vertebrates
(NOTE: Evolutionary adaptations of invertebrate phyla and of vertebrate classes are excluded)
Classification of Chordates excluded
10. FORM AND FUNCTIONS IN PLANTS
10.3.1 Uptake of Water by Roots and Pathways
10.3.2 Ascent of Sap
10.3.3 Opening and Closing of Stomata
10.3.4 Translocation of Organic Matter
10.6 Growth and Development in Plants
10.6.1 Tissues for Growth – Apical and Lateral Meristems
10.6.2 Primary and Secondary Growth
10.7.2 Gcotropism and Phototropism
10.7.4 Vernalization
11. DIGESTION
11.1 Digestive System of Man
11.1.1 Alimentary Canal: Structural and Functional details
12. CIRCULATION
12.1 Blood Circulatory System of Man
12.1.1 Heart
12.1.1.1 Structure of Heart
12.1.1.3 Heartbeat and its Control
12.1.2 Blood Vessels (Arteries. Capillaries and Veins)
12.3 Lymphatic System of Man
13. IMMUNITY
13.1 First Line of Defense (Skin. Digestive Tract. Air Passageway)
13.2 Second Line of Defense – The Nonspecific Defenses
13.2.1 Killing Cells of Blood
13.2.2 Protective Proteins

13.2.3 Inflammatory Response
13.3 Third Line of Defense – The Specific Defenses
13.3.2 Cell-mediated and Antibody-mediated immunity Activation of T-Cells excluded.

REDUCED SYLLABUS
CHEMISTRY-XI
1. STOICHIOMETRY
Introduction
1.1 Mole
1.2 Avogadro’s Number
1.3 PercentageComposition
1.4 Excess and LimitingReagents
1.5 Percentage Yield
2. ATOM ICSTRUCTl JRE
Introduction
2.4 Bohr’s Atomic Model and its applications
2.4.1 – 2.4.5 Derivation of Radius. Energy, Frequency, WaveLength,
Wave Number
2.4.6 Defects of Bohr’s atomic model
2.4.7 Hydrogen Spectrum
2.5 Planck’s QuantumTheory_
2.7 Quantum Numbers and orbitals
1. Principle QuantumNumber
2. Azimuthal QuantumNumber
3. Magnetic QuantumNumber
4. Spin QuantumNumber
5. Shapes of s, p, and orbitals
2.7.1 Shells and sub-shells or orbitals
2.8 Electronic Configuration
2.8.1 The relative energies of atomic orbital
2.8.2 Rules
3. THEORIESOFCOVALENTBONDINGANDSHAPESOF.MOLECIJLES
Introduction
3.1 Shapes of molecules
3.1.1 VSEPR
3.2 Theories of covalentbonding
3.2.1 VBT and hybridization
3.2.3 MOT
4. GASES
Introduction
4.2.3 Effect of change in P on V of gas (Boyle’s law)
4.2.4 Effect of change in T on V of gas (Charle’s law)
4.2.5 AbsoluteZero
4.3 Avogadro’ sLaw
4.4 Ideal GasEquation (4.4.1 – 4.4.3)
4.5 Deviation From Ideal GasBehavior.

4.5.1 Why real gases deviate from gas law?
4.6 Van der WaalsEquation
4.7 Dalton’s law of partial pressure and its application
4.8 Graham’s Law of Diffusion and effusion
5. LIQUIDS
Introduction
5.2 Intermolecular Forces
5.2.1 Dipole-Dipoleinteraction
5.2.2 LondonForces
5.2.3 Hydrogen Bonding
5.3 LiquidCrystals
5.4.4 Liquid crystal and their uses in daily life history
5.4.5 How to differentiate between liquid crystals from pure liquids and
crystalline solid.
6.
SOLIDS
Introduction
6.3
6.4
6.5
1. Anisotropy
2. Isomorphism
3. Polymorphism
4. Allotropy
5. Transition
Temperature
Crystal Lattice
6.4.1 Unit Cell & Shape of NaCl
6.5.2 Lattice energy
Types of Crystalline Solids
6.5.1 Ionic Solids
6.5.2 Covalent Solids
6.5.5 Molecular and metallic Solids
7. CHEMICAL EQUILIBRIUM
Introduction
7.1.1 Law of Mass Action
7.1.2 Examples of EquilibriumConstant expression
7.1.3 Units of the equilibrium constant
7.1.4 Equilibrium expression including partial pressure, no of moles and
mole fraction.
7.1.5 Types of equilibrium
7.1.7 Applications of the equilibrium constant
7.2 Factors Affecting Equilibrium ( Le-Chatellier Principle)
7.2.1 Effect of Change inConcentration
7.2.2 Effect of Change in Pressure or volume
7.2.3 Effect of Change in temperature
7.3 Industrial Application of Le-Chatellier Principle (Haber’sProcess)
7.5 Common IonEffect.

8. ACIDS, BASES AND SALTS
Introduction
8.2 8.2.2 Relative Strength of Acids andBases
8.3 Conjugate Acid-BasePairs
8.4 Strength of Acids andBases
8.4.1 Ionization Equation of water and calculation of PH and POH in
aqueous medium using given Kw values.
8.4.2 Strong and weak acid
8.4.3 Strong and weak base
8.4.4 Relationship of Ka and Kb
8.6 Buffer Solutions and theirApplications
8.7 SaltHydrolysis
9. CHEMICAL KINETICS
Introduction
9.1 RatesofReactions
9.1.1 Determination of initial rate
9.1.2 Rate law
9.2.3 Order of Reaction and rate equation
9.2 Collision Theory, Transition State and ActivationEnergy
10. SOLUTIONS AND COLLOIDS
Introduction
10.2 ConcentrationUnits
10.2.1 Percent
10.2.2 Molarity
10.2.3 Molality
10.2.4 Mole fraction
10.2.5 parts per million, billion, and trillion
10.3 Raoult’sLaw
10.3.1 Causes of lowering of vapor pressure
10.4 Colligative Properties
10.4.1 Lowering of vapor pressure
10.4.2 Elevation of boiling point
10.4.3 Depression in freezing point
11. THERMOCHEMISTRY
11.8 Hess’s Law: Enthalpy C’hangeCalculations
11.9 Bom HaberCycle
12. ELECTROCHEMISTRY
Introduction
12.1 Oxidation-ReductionC’oncepts
12.1.2 OxidationNumbers
12.1.3 Balancing of the equation.

12.2 Electrode, Electrode Potential and ElectrochemicalSeries
12.2.2 Cell potential
12.2.3 Standard Hydrogen electrode
12.2.4 Determination of cell potential
12.2.5 Electrochemical series
12.2.6 Activity series of metal
Note: Topic related questions of self-check exercises and end exercise are included. Society, technology, and science of all chapters are not included. It is obvious that questions related to the topics not mentioned above are not included in the exam. Paper will be curriculum-based, not book-based.

REDUCED SYLLABUS MATHEMATICS-XI

Chapter 1 Number Systems
Exercise 1.1 Ql; Q3(iii. v, vi): Q4: Q5; Q6
Exercise 1.2 Q3: Q4; Q5: Q6: Q7; Q8; Q9; Q10: Qll; Q12: Q13; Q14(i. ii);
Q15(ii. iii): Q16
Exercise 1.3 Ql(ii, iv. viii): Q2(i, iii); Q3(ii); Q4; Q5: Q6: Q7
Page 03 Example 2
Page 20 Example l(iii, iv)
Page 21 Theorem (i, iii, v, vi)
Page 24 Example 2
Chapter 2 Sets, Functions, and Groups
Exercise 2.1 Ql(iv, vii, xi); Q2(iv, v, vi, xii): Q9(ii, iii, iv)
Exercise 2.2 Ql(i, iv); Q2(i): Q5(i. ii, iii); Q6
Exercise 2.3 Q3; Q5; 08: 09
Exercise 2.4 Ql; 02; 03; Q4; Q5
Exercise 2.5 Ql; 02; 03; Q4
Exercise 2.6 Ql; Q3; Q4
Exercise 2.7 02: 04; Q7
Exercise 2.8 02: 04: Q5; Q6: Q7; 0»: Q10
Page 77 Theorem
Page 78 Theorem
Chapter 3 Matrices and Determinants
Exercise 3.1 02: 08: Q10: Qll; 012: 013: Q14
Exercise 3.2 Q3(i, ii): Q5(i); Q7; Q9(i)
Exercise 3.3 01(iv, v, vi); 02: 03; 04: Q5; 06; 08: 09: 010: 011: Q12(i. ii): 013;
014:015; Q16:017
Exercise 3.4 Ql; Q2; Q3; Q4: Q5; Q6; Q7; Q8; Q9(i, ii); Q10(i, ii)
Exercise 3.5 Ql(i, ii); Q2(ii, iii); Q3; Q4(i, ii); Q5(i); Q6
Chapter4 Quadratic Equations
Exercise 4.1 Q5; Q8; Q12; Q19; Q20
Exercise 4.2 Q2; Q3; Q5; Q7; Q8: Q9; Q10; Q12; Q13; Q14; Q16: Q17; Q18; Q19; Q20:
Q22
Exercise 4.3 Q2; Q3; Q5; Q6; Q7; Q8; Q9; Q10; Q12
Exercise 4.4 Ql; Q2(iii, v); Q3; Q4; Q6; Q7; Q8
Exercise 4.5 Q10; Q14; Q15; Q16
Exercise 4.6 Q3; Q5; Q7; Q8: Q9
Exercise 4.7 Q3; Q4(i, iii); Q7; Q8
Exercise 4.8 Q4; Q7; Q8; Q9; Q10
Exercise 4.9 Q3; Q6; Q7; Q8; Q9; Q10
Exercise 4.10 Q7; Q9; Q ll; Q14; Q15; Q17; Q19
Page 143 Example 1
Page 174 Example 2
Chapter 5 Partial Fractions
Exercise 5.1 Q4;Q 5; Q8;Q 9;Q 11
Exercise 5.2 Q2; Q6; Q9; Q10; Q12
Exercise 5.3 Q3; Q4; Q6; Q8; Q9; Q10
Exercise 5.4 Ql; Q2; Q3
Chapter 6 Sequences and Series
Exercise 6.2 Q2; Q3; Q5; Q7; Q8; Q9; Q ll; Q12; Q13; Q14
Exercise 6.3 Q2; Q3; Q4; Q7; Q8
Exercise 6.4 Ql; Q2(i, iv, vi); Q3(ii); Q4(ii); Q5; Q7; Q8; Q9; Q12; Q13; Q14;
015:016:017; 018
Exercise 6.5 Q2; Q3; Q5; Q6; Q9
Exercise 6.6 Q2; Q4; Q5; Q6; Q7(i, iii); Q8; Q10; Qll; Q12; Q13; Q14
Exercise 6.7 Q3; Q4; Q5; Q6; Q7; Q8
Exercise 6.8 Q2(i); Q3(ii); Q4: Q5(iii, v); Q6(i, iii. vi); Q7: Q9: Q10: Qll; Q12; Q14
Exercise 6.9 Q2; Q3; Q4
Exercise 6.10 Q2; Q3; Q5; Q6; Q9; Qll; Q13; Q14(i); Q15(ii); Q17; Q18
Page 201 Example 2, Example 3
Page 214 Example 6
Chapter 7 Permutation, Combination, and Probability
Exercise 7.1 Ql(v, vii, ix, x)
Exercise 7.2 Q2; Q3; Q5; Q7; Q8; Q9; Q10; Q ll; Q12; Q13; Q14
Exercise 7.3 Q3; Q5; Q6; Q7; Q8; Q9; Q10; Q12
Exercise 7.4 Q2; Q3; Q4; Q5; Q6; Q7; Q9; Q10
Exercise 7.5 Q5; Q7; Q10
Exercise 7.6 Q3
Exercise 7.7 Ql; Q3; Q4; Q5; Q6; Q7; Q8
Exercise 7.8 Q2; Q4; Q6; Q8; Q9; Q10
Chapter 8 Mathematical Induction
Exercise 8.1 Q2; Q5; Q7; Q9; Q13; Q15; Q18: Q20: Q21(ii, iv); Q23; Q24; Q27; Q28:
Q34; Q36: Q37
Exercise 8.2 Q1 (iii. iv, v, vi); Q3(ii, iii, iv); Q4(i, ii); Q5(i); Q6(ii, iii, iv); Q7; Q8; Q9(i, iii);
Q10; Q ll: Q12; Q13; Q14
Exercise 8.3 Ql (iii. v, vii, viii, x); Q3(ii, iv, v); Q4(ii, iii, iv, v, vi, vii); Q5(i); Q6; Q7;
Q9(i. ii); Q10; Q ll: Q12; Q13
Chapter 9 Fundamentals of Trigonometry
Exercise 9.1 Q4; Q5; Q7; Q9; Q10; Q12; Q13; Q15; Q16
Exercise 9.2 Q4; Q5; Q6: Q7; Q8
Exercise 9.3 Q4; Q5; Q6
Exercise 9.4 Ql; Q4; Q6; Q9: Q ll; Q13; Q14; Q15: Q16: Q17; Q18; Q19: Q22: Q23: Q24
Chapter 10 Trigonometric Identities
Exercise 10.1 Q3(ii, iii): Q4: Q5
Exercise 10.2 Q3(i); Q4(iii. iv, v); Q5; Q6; Q7: Q8: Q9: Q10: Qll; Q12; Q13; Q14(i, iv, vi)
Exercise 10.3 Ql; Q5; Q6: Q7; Q9: Q10: Q12; Q13; Q14
Exercise 10.4 Ql(iii. vi, viii); Q2(iii. vi); Q3; Q4; Q5
Page 314 Article 10.1.2
Chapter 11 Trigonometric Functions and their Graphs
Exercise 11.1 Ql; Q4; Q9; Q ll; Q12; Q15
Exercise 11.2 Ql(i, iii. vi); Q2
Page 339 Theorem 11.1
Page 340 Theorem 11.2
Chapter 12 Applications of Trigonometry
Exercise 12.3 Q9; Q10; Qll; Q13; Q15
Exercise 12.4 Q4; Q5
Exercise 12.5 Q3;Q4;Q5: Q8: Q9:Q11;Q12
Exercise 12.6 Q2;Q4;Q6: Q7; Q8: Q10
Exercise 12.7 Ql(ii); Q2(i); Q3(ii); Q4; Q5; Q6
Exercise 12.8 Ql(ii); Q2; Q3; Q4; Q5; Q6: Q7(ii); Q8; Q9: Q10; Qll: Q12
Page 377 Article 12.9

Chapter 13 Inverse Trigonometric functions

Exercise 13.1 Ql(iii, iv, vii, viii, ix); Q2(i, ii); Q3(i. iii, iv, v, viii)
Exercise 13.2 Ql; Q2; Q3: Q4: Q5; Q6; Q8; Q9; Q10; Q ll; Q12; Q13; Q14; Q15; Q16;
017:018:019
Chapter 14 Solutions of Trigonometric Equations
Exercise 14 Q2; Q3: Q7; Q8; Q9; Q10; Qll; Q12; Q13; Q15; Q17; Q20
Page 406 Example 5

REDUCED SYLLABUS
STATISTICS-XI

1. Introduction to Statistics: Collection (1/8) and Presentation of Data

Content Scope

Nature and Importance of the Science of Statistics, Statistical Data, Population, and sample. A brief revision of classification, tabulation, and frequency distributions and their graphic representation

Define Statistics, give importance of measurements, and different fields of science where measurements are useful. Explain different types of raw data in the fields of Science and Humanities, mainly in Medicine, in Agriculture, in Chemistry, and Psychology. Explain the difference between a population and a sample, use sketches for showing population. Explain the importance of the sample. Demonstrate types of frequency distributions like symmetrical and non- symmetrical Cumulative and relative frequency distributions be explained by the use of sketches. Explain bar charts in different forms namely; divided bar charts, compound bar charts. Give an explanation for expressing data in rectangles and pie charts.

2. Measure of Location and Dispersion. (2/8)

Contents Scope

Arithmetic mean. Geometric mean. Median. Mode, Range. Mean Deviation, Variance, Standard deviation. Difference between Absolute and Relative Measures of Dispersion. Skewness.

Explain arithmetic mean and variance of raw data from a frequency table, using midpoints and also by a change of origin and scale and their properties. To explain geometric mean, use ungrouped data as well as grouped data. Explain the method of direct calculation using root and also by using logarithms. To explain the median and quantiles graphical method be explained as well. Mathematical proofs are not required.

3. Index Number (1/8)

Content Scope
Introduction to Index numbers concept of price
index numbers steps involved in the construction of price index numbers “Unweighted price index numbers (fixed based and chain based method)” weighted price index.

Explain the index numbers as a useful statistical technique to assess the growth or fall of a certain item or economic series with respect to time or any other unit. Price index numbers by simple relative and link relative

numbers (Laspeyer’spaasche’s and fisher’s)
consumer price index number.

methods are explained. The price index and its constructions must be given as examples. Fixed base and chain base methods for price indices be explained. The concept of weights be explained with reference to the arithmetic means in grouped data. Laspeyr’s and Fisher’s indices are explained by applying the standard results on a number of exercises. Consumer price index numbers are explained in general and with reference to Pakistan. Similarly, wholesale price index numbers to be also explained in a similar way.

4. Simple Linear Regression and Correlation (1/8)

Contents Scope
Bivariable data (non-random versus random
variable) scatter diagram: estimation of
regression parameters by least squares method,
properties of the regression line; interpretation
and applications of the regression line.

Bivariate data, (random versus random
variable) scatter diagram: point estimation of
population correlation co-efficient; properties
of the sample correlation co-efficient;
interpretation and application.

Explain “Bivariate data”, by giving sketches of scatter diagrams when one variable is specified
and several values of the response variable are assumed given at each nonrandom variable similarly, the sketches when both variables are
random be also drawn and explained. Least square method be explained, the normal equation
be formed and estimation of regression parameters be given in terms of Z X, Z Y, Z XY, Z Y2, and Z X2. Both the regression lines be explained by considering an example in which few values of the two variables are given the properties to be included are :

i. Sum up squares of deviation from the regression line is minimum.

ii.   The point of intersection of regression lines at (X, Y).

Interpret by explaining the use of a line of regression for forecasting and for estimating at “n” unknown values of the independent variable.

Explain the correlation co-efficient by explaining bivariate data in which both variables are random, the calculation of correlation co-efficient be explained by considering examples. The properties of correlations co-efficient be explained by considering:

• rxy fyx

ii. r lying between 1 and +1.

iii. the value of correlation co-efficient
does not change by the change of origin
and scale and correlation can be obtained
by the geometric mean of the regression co-
efficient.

5. Analysis of time series (1/8)

Contents Scope

Introduction to the concept of time series; nature of fluctuations, signal, and noise, components of a time series, measurement of secular, semi averages, moving averages and least squares (linear), advantages and limitations of these methods.

Explain the time series as a series in which one variable is time occurring at specified intervals (nonrandom and the other variable is random). Examples are given from Economics, Public Administration. Business administration. Trade and Commerce. Fluctuation in the time series is explained in terms of a trend which is given in terms of components of a time series and random fluctuations as noise. Linear and quadratic forms of time series are considered. The linear and quadratic time series be compared with the trend obtained by free hand, semi averages, and moving averages method.

REDUCED SYLLABUS
ECONOMICS-XI
I. Nature and Scope of Economics
A. Introduction
1. Wants and satisfaction
2. Goods and services
3. Utility and scarcity
4. Economic problems and its nature.
5. Definition by:
a) Adam Smith
b) Alfred Marshall
c) Lionel Robbins.
II. Consumer’s Behaviour and its Analysis
1. Definition
2. Meaning
3. Rationale
4. The law of diminishing marginal utility with table and graph.
5. The law of Equi marginal utility or law of substitution with formula and diagram.
6. Indifference curve.
7. Definitions and Characteristics (graphical presentation).
III. Basic Tools of Statistics and Mathematics in Economics
i. ) Variables:
Continuous discontinuous, independent dependent.
ii. ) Liner equation with group.
iii. ) Quadratic equation.
iv. ) Simultaneous equations.
IV. Demand
1. Definition.
2. Law of demand.
3. Demand function and functional equation of demand.
4. Movement along the demand curve and shift in the demand curve.
5. Price elasticity of demand (Arc & point) and methods of measurement.
6. Concepts of income elasticity and cross-elasticity of demand.
7. Factors influencing the elasticity of demand.
8. Practical uses of the concept of elasticity of demand.
V. Supply
1. Definitions stock and supply.
2. Law of supply.
3. Supply the functional equation of supply.
4. Movement along the supply curve and shift in the supply curve.
5. Elasticity of supply and its measurement.

6. Factors influencing the elasticity of supply.
7. Practical uses of the concepts.
VI. Equilibrium
1. Concept of equilibrium.
2. Equilibrium of demand and supply.
3. Equilibrium in price and equilibrium in output.
4. The effects on equilibrium in price and output due to change in demand and
supply.
IX. Cost of Production
1. Definition, classification, Fixed, and variable.
2. Total, average, and marginal cost.
3. Relationship between total average and marginal cost.
X. Revenue Analysis
1. Definition.
2. Total marginal and average revenue under perfect competition and monopoly.
3. Price and output determination and short and long run under perfect competition
and monopoly.
XI. Market
Meaning and significance of the market.
1. Perfect competition and monopoly.
2. Short run and long run in perfect competition and monopoly.

REDUCED SYLLABUS
COMPUTER SCIENCE-XI
1. OVERVIEW OF COMPUTER SYSTEM
1.1 Introduction to Computer
1.2 Computer Software
2. COMPUTER MEMORY
2.1 Introduction
2.2 Main Memory
3. CENTRAL PROCESSING UNIT
3.1 Inside CPU
3.2 CPU Operations
5. NETW ORK COMMUNICATION AND PROTOCOLS
5.1 Introduction
5.2 Data Communication standards
5.3 TCP/IP
6. WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS
6.1 Introduction
7. DATABASE FUNDAMENTALS
7.1 Introduction
7.2 Basic Database Terminologies
7.3 Planning a Database
7.4 Data Modeling and Entity Relationship Diagram
7.5 Relational Schema
8. DATABASE DEVELOPMENT
8.1 Introduction
(i) Identify various relational database management systems (MS Access, Open Office Base. SQL Server)
(ii) Select any suitable DBMS as an application for creating and maintaining databases
(iii) Explain the steps involved to create and save a database (For Practical only)
(iv) Explain the following in Database Environment:
Database Toolbar
Database Window
Objects
Tables
Queries
Forms
Reports

8.2 Working with Tables
(i) Explain different ways of creating, saving and editing a table in database.
(For Practical only)
(ii) Identify various available data types
(iii) Create a primary key and foreign key in the tables. (For Practical only)
(iv) Create and edit relationship among tables. (For Practical only)
(v) Use navigation buttons to navigate through records in a table. (For
Practical only)
(vi) Add, modify and delete records from a table. (For Practical only)
8.3 Working with Forms
(i) Explain different ways of crating, saving and editing a form in a database.
(For Practical only)
(ii) Know different Form views
(iii) Use the navigation buttons to navigate through records displayed in a
Form. (For Practical only)
(iv) Add, modify and delete records. (For Practical only)
(v) Use Form controls. (For Practical only)
8.4 Working with queries and commands
(i) Explain different ways of creating, saving and editing a query in a
database. (For Practical only )
(ii) Use following queries on database
SELECT (Where, Group by. Order by)
UPDATE
DELETE
INSERT
ALTER
8.5 Generating Reports
(i) use the report wizard to generate a report. (For Practical only)
(ii) se various report layouts/styles to produce reports
(iii) Set the sort order of records that will appear on the report
(iv) Customized reports using queries (macros and arithmetic expressions)
(For Practical only)
Save, view, and print the report. (For Practical only)
(v)

REDUCED SYLLABUS
HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION-XI
A. Physical Education
1. Physical Education and its importance
3. Scope of activities:
b. Recreational
d. Rules and fundamental skill of games:
i. Boys: Volleyball
ii. Girls: Volleyball
e. Rules and fundamental skill of Athletics:
i. Boys: Short put: 4×100 meters relay
ii. Girls: Short put: 4×100 meters relay
B. Health Education
1. Definition of health, its relationship to physical education
2. Human organism and how it works: functioning of the following systems (in detail):
b. Respiratory
3. First Aid:
a. Treatment of athletics injuries like sprain, strain, pulled muscle, sore muscle, and cramp
b. Fractures: Types and treatment

REDUCED SYLLABUS
PHILOSOPHY-XI
ELEMENTS OF PHILOSOPHY
1. Introduction
a. What is Philosophy?
b. What are the specific philosophical questions?
c. Philosophical Approaches Criticism1 Speculation
2. Philosophy and Religion
a. Questions asked in Philosophy and Religion
b. Their treatment
c. Difference
d. Allama Muhammad Iqbal’s Educational Philosophy
3. Philosophy and Science
a. What does science try to understand?
b. How is it different from philosophy?
c. What role does philosophy play in the growth of science?
i. Interprets
ii. Criticizes
iii. Resolves conflicts
iv. Justifies
4. Knowledge
a. Definition of knowledge
b. Sources of knowledge:
i. Rationalism
ii. Empiricism
iii. Intuition and Revelation
iv. Authority
Introduction of the basic philosophy of Imam Ghazali
5. Metaphysics
a. Monism
b. Dualism
c. Pluralism
d. School’s of Idealism and Materialism
6. Ethics
b. Ethical theories:
i. Golden Mean
ii. Utilitarianism
iii. Goodwill
An Islamic theory of Ethics
c.

REDUCED SYLLABUS
GEOGRAPH Y-XI
I.
II.
III.
IV.
V.
VII.
VIII.
Understanding Geography
1. The Nature of Geography
2. Scope
3. Relationship with other Sciences
The Earth Basic Concerns
3. The Earth’s structure and composition
Rocks
1. Formation classification and characteristics of rocks
Major Land Forms
1. Mountains Plateaus and plains
Denudation
1. Weathering
2. Erosion
The Atmosphere
1. Introduction
2. Weather and Climate
3. Distribution of Atmosphere and Pressure
4. Winds
5. Precipitation
Oceans and Seas
1. The Oceans and Seas
3. Ocean currents

REDUCED SYLLABUS
EDUCATION-XI
II.
in.
IV.
v.
VI.
VII.
VIII.
Education
1. Importance and description of Education
2. Role and Scope of Education as a subject/discipline Teachers. Students. Content areas.
Milieu. Environment Culture
3. Function of Education
4. Model of Education. Formal, informal and non-formal
Conversation
Transmission
Reformation
Aims of Education
1. Spiritual and Moral aims
2. Intellectual aims
3. Economic1 Vocational aims
4. Citizenship (Socio-cultural) aims
Foundations of Education
1. Introduction
2. Islamic foundation of Education
3. Importance of Education in Islam
4. Sources of knowledge Philosophical foundations
5. What is Philosophy, Philosophical foundation?
Ideology. Religious, Customs, norms & students
Human Development
1. Explanation of the concepts of I luman Development and Growth
2. Difference between growth and development with examples
3. Individual differences and teaching-learning process
Learning
1. Meaning and definitions
2. Trail and error, imitation, insight (arising from intellectual rigor, learning by doing
3. Law of readiness
4. Law of Exercise
5. Law of Effective
6. Readiness, motivation, interest Attention, meaningful’relevant. attitude
Society Community and Education
1. Society and community (meaning and definition)
2. Explain the Interrelationship of society and Education
Guidance and Counseling
1. Guidance and counseling (meaning and definition)
2. Needs & role of guidance and counseling in school
3. Forms of guidance (Education and Career)
4. Need and importance of counseling in schools
Curriculum. syllabus and Textbook
1. Meaning and definition of curriculum
2. Differences between curriculum, syllabus, and textbooks
3. Components of curriculum
4. Importance of Assessment and evaluation.

REDUCED SYLLABUS
OUTLINES OF HOME ECONOMICS-XI
Home Management:
1. Values and goals & standards as related to management in the home; discussion of some
values and goal as observed by Pakistani families: the importance of developing goals as a
means of realizing values
2. Resources: human and materials:
b. Energy management-ways of avoiding fatigue
c. Simplifications
3. a. Types of income
b. Budgeting and its advantages
c. Account keeping
5. Family Housing:
a. First Aid elementary
b. i. Storage of summer and winter clothes and household equipment
ii. Storage of foodstuff (perishable and non-perishable foods)
iii. Storage of books, shoes and extra furniture, and another household
equipment
Child Development:
6. Basic human needs, physical and psychological
a. Principles of growth and development from birth to 5 years
c. Understanding and guiding children: Characteristics of the toddler and the pre-
school age child (development tasks), understanding and dealing with children
problems such as fear, anger, jealousy, bedwetting, and thumb sucking.

REDUCED SYLLABUS FINE ARTS HSSC-I With General Outline

Chapters Points to be discussed Generally Contents to be focused on:
Prehistoric Art • General introduction to Term
“Prehistoric” initial phase of
diverse cultures.

• Concept of B.C.E and C.E.

• Paleolithic age, Mesolithic age.
Neolithic age

• Share the world map with the
students indicating the
primitive art; cave paintings,
sculpture and structures. Give
special reference of Potohar
and Baluchistan in Pakistan.

s Hall of Bulls (painting)
s Venus of Willendorf (sculpture)

S Stone Henge (Architecture)

(discuss in the detailed timeline. Area, tools
used.

material and technique of above
mentioned)

Egyptian

civilization

• Introduction to Egyptian
Civilization

• Timeline. Geographical
conditions, economic
conditions, social set up,
religious beliefs

• Burial system (Mastaba and
Pyramids)

• Hieroglyphs and murals in
tombs

• Book of death with reference
to the religious and artistic
practices, a brief introduction.

S Great Pyramid of khufu
* Rameses II (seated sculpture of
Rameses at the temple of Abu Simbel)
S Narmer palette 3000 B.C.

S Fowling Scene from the tomb of
Nebamun. Thebes. Egypt
(discuss the timeline. area. plan,
influences, symbolism, material and
technique

with special reference to the decorative
the aspect of the above mentioned)

Indus Valiev
Art 4000-1800

B.C.

Mohenjo-Daro
& llarappa

• Mehrgarh, the pre- Indus period

• Introduction to Indus valley
civilization.

Important cities; Mohenjo-
Daro and Harappa

• Timeline, Geographical
conditions, economic
conditions, social set up.
religious beliefs,

• Trade links with Mesopotamia
and Egypt

• Exploring, establishing and
identifying the relationship of
the Indus art and present

S Great Bath
S Seals

> Unicom seal

> Bull seal

>   Yogi seal
S King-Priest

s Dancing Girl

(discuss in the detailed timeline. area. plan,
influences, symbolism, material and
technique

and decorative aspects of the above
mentioned)

  practices.  
Buddhist Art • Introduction to Mauryan
Empire 321-233 B.C.

• Difference in treatment of
Buddha’s image in Hinayana
and Mahayana sects

• Significance of Ajanta Caves

• Comprehension of the
the symbolism of Bodhisattva,
Buddha. Mudras, Stupa and
Ashokan Pillars

S The great stupa of Sanchi 3rd

Century B.C.E

* Takht-e- Bahi MonastervGandhara

and Kushan schools 1“ -3rd century
A.D.

* Ajanta Caves

> Buddha with Blue Lotus

> Composition with White
elephant

(discuss in the detail timeline. Area. plan,
influences, symbolism, subject matter,
materials, techniques, and decorative
aspects of the above mentioned)

CLASSICAL ART
Greek

Civilization

• Introduction to Greek
civilization

• General outline of architectural
achievements of Greeks

• Knowledge of the standardized
proportions established in
Greek period in art and
architecture

• Timeline, Geographical
conditions, economic
conditions, social set up.
religious beliefs

S Disco bolos by Myron (Roman
copy)

• Parthenon (also introduce Greek
orders)

• Theater (Epidaurus, Greece )

(discuss in the detailed timeline. Area. plan,
influences, symbolism, subject matter,
materials, techniques, and decorative
aspects of the above mentioned)

Roman

Civilization

• Introduction to Roman
civilization

• Architectural achievements of
Romans.

• Timeline, Geographical
condition, geological
condition, social set up.
religious beliefs

* Portrait of Augustus as general

from Primaporta. Italy; early 1**
a century of a bronze original of 20
BCE, marble. Rome.

S Colosseum, Rome. Italy, 70-80 BCE
(also introduce roman order of
architecture)

(discuss in the detailed timeline. Area. plan,
influences, symbolism, subject matter,
materials, techniques, and decorative
aspects of the above mentioned)